Pope Francis's Statement On SSPX Confessions

Pope Francis's Statement On SSPX Confessions

From http://sspx.org/en/news-events/news/pope-francis-statement-sspx-confessions

 

On Monday, November 21st, 2016, the Vatican released an Apostolic Letter from Pope Francis called Misericordia et Misera. Of note to our readers, the Society of St. Pius X was mentioned in paragraph 12:
 

For the Jubilee Year I had also granted that those faithful who, for various reasons, attend churches officiated by the priests of the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Pius X, can validly and licitly receive the sacramental absolution of their sins. For the pastoral benefit of these faithful, and trusting in the good will of their priests to strive with God’s help for the recovery of full communion with the Catholic Church, I have personally decided to extend this faculty beyond the Jubilee Year, until further provisions are made, lest anyone ever be deprived of the sacramental sign of reconciliation through the Church’s pardon."






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